How to Rethink ‘Home’ and ‘Travel’ if Your Job Is Now Remote

Many things have changed due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, and work is one aspect of life that will probably never be the same after the pandemic’s over. As remote working slowly becomes the norm for workers all around the globe, more people are able to reap the benefits of this flexible approach to work. From more autonomy to increased productivity to lower environmental footprint, remote working certainly offers a number of perks.

Because remote workers have multiple options to choose from, you may be wondering which one is the best fit for you. Below, we’re listing several different ways to rethink “home” and “travel” if your job is now remote.

Decide if you want to stay or go

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Traveling constantly and exploring all the amazing cities is a popular choice for many remote workers. However, it’s not the only option, and whereas some individuals choose to become full digital nomads, others decide to stay exactly where they are at the moment.

Of course, not everything is black and white when it comes to working remotely. There are a number of other options available to you if your job is now remote. You may choose to travel for a while and then return to a home base, renting it in-between their trips. You can take your time to explore each city you’re staying in and rent for longer, and you can also choose to relocate in winter, seeking regions with warmer climates (the so-called “snowbirding”). The beauty of working remotely is that it offers so much room for flexibility, and it’s all about finding what works for you best.

Reside abroad

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Relocating overseas to live in another country has its perks. The question is: is this the right option for you? The truth is, residing abroad can be an amazing way to take advantage of places with lower cost of living. For someone earning a U.S. salary, moving to places such as Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, and Romania could be a dream come true in terms of finances.

Still, it’s important to remember that moving abroad isn’t exactly as easy as packing a couple of bags and catching a flight. There are a number of things to consider, from visas to tax rules and other similar complexities. Plus, if you do decide to become an expat, you also need to make sure that your job will allow it. Sometimes, administrative causes will stand in a remote worker’s way of relocating to another country, so make sure to check with your company’s HR team whether you can move or must remain in a certain country.

Explore locally

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If you’re someone who’s used to traveling a lot and working remotely, you may be wondering what your travel options are now. Because of the global health situation we’re currently in, some remote workers may face limitations in terms of moving across the border. In that case, domestic travel could be a great way for remote workers to continue visiting different places.

For U.S. remote workers looking to explore cities in Texas, it’d be a good idea to find apartments for rent in Odessa that they can book long-term and stay for a while. Instead of moving constantly, they can experience everything a city has to offer while working remotely. This is a great example of slow-madism, which is all about taking the time to really explore and get to know a certain destination.

Move somewhere cheaper

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You may like a certain place, but the truth is, if you’re looking to save money, it’d be a good idea to check out different, more affordable options that are available. With many remote workers stuck in places that they can barely afford, realizing that you can live someplace else for a lot less can seem like an exciting opportunity.

However, the reality of moving somewhere cheaper is that locales that tend to be on a cheaper side are like that for a reason. This is why it’s not wise to base your decisions solely on how low the living costs are in a particular city/country. Just because living there is cheap doesn’t mean you should buy a property, nor does it necessarily mean that you’ll be happy there. On the other hand, if you’ve found a cheap city you want to relocate to, be sure to spend some time there as a slo-mad, just to be on the safe side.

Wrapping up

As you can see, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to working remotely. What you can do is experiment a bit to see what works for you. Consider your values rather than the cost of living when making a decision, and you can rest assured that you’ll be making the right choice.

 Article by Sophia Smith

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